Genus Proplatycnemis Kennedy, 1920
Malagasy featherlegs

Synonyms:

  • scientific: formerly placed in genus Platycnemis Burmeister, 1839

Type species: Platycnemis hova Martin, 1908

Introduction

Of about 35 featherleg damselfly species (subfamily Platcycnemidinae) that occur in the temperate and tropical zones of the Old World, almost a third is confined to Madagascar and the Comoros. Although traditionally placed in Platycnemis, these are all best classified in Proplatycnemis. A single relative (hindwing 20-21 mm) is known only from one bare, seasonal and deeply shaded stream in the last remaining forest on Pemba Island, off the coast of Tanzania. [Adapted from Dijkstra & Clausnitzer 2014]

Diagnosis

Quadrilaterals rectangular, in Fw anterior border about 3x as long as distal border; 2 cells between quadrilateral and subnode [2-3]. Head very wide, about 3x as broad as deep. [Allocnemis]IR3 originates closer to subnode than R4; Cux stands distal from origin of anal vein by about its own length. Wings clear. Anal vein terminates distal to node. Paraprocts slender, much longer than high. Legs largely orange, yellow or white, with (somewhat) dilated tibiae. [Copera]Dilations of mid and hind tibiae more than 3x as wide as shaft. Legs white. Cerci less than ½ length of paraprocts. Pemba, Tanzania

Male of genus is similar to Copera by (a) head very wide, about 3x as broad as deep; (b) wings clear; (c) quadrilaterals rectangular, in Fw anterior border about 3x as long as distal border; 2 cells between quadrilateral and subnode [2-3]; (d) Cux stands distal from origin of anal vein by about its own length; (e) anal vein terminates distal to node; (f) IR3 originates closer to subnode than R4; (g) paraprocts slender, much longer than high. However, differs by (1) being restricted to Pemba, Tanzania; (2) legs white, rather than yellow to orange; (3) dilations of mid and hind tibiae more than 3x as wide as shaft; (4) cerci less than ½ length of paraprocts. [Adapted from Dijkstra & Clausnitzer 2014; this diagnosis not yet verified by author]

Map citation: Clausnitzer, V., K.-D.B. Dijkstra, R. Koch, J.-P. Boudot, W.R.T. Darwall, J. Kipping, B. Samraoui, M.J. Samways, J.P. Simaika & F. Suhling, 2012. Focus on African Freshwaters: hotspots of dragonfly diversity and conservation concern. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 10: 129-134.


References

  • Dijkstra, K.-D.B, and Clausnitzer, V. (2014). The Dragonflies and Damselflies of Eastern Africa: handbook for all Odonata from Sudan to Zimbabwe. Studies in Afrotropical Zoology, 298, 1-264.
  • Martin, R. (1908.) Voyages de feu Leonardo Fea dans l'Afrique Occi­dentale: Odonates. Annali Museo Civico Storia Naturale Genova, 43, 649-667. [PDF file]

Citation: Dijkstra, K.-D.B (editor). African Dragonflies and Damselflies Online. http://addo.adu.org.za/ [2017-04-26].