Genus Ictinogomphus Cowley, 1934
tigertails

Synonyms:

  • scientific: Cinitogomphus Pinhey, 1964 [dundoensis]

Type species: Ictinus ferox Rambur, 1842

Introduction

Over 15 species are known, ranging east to Australia, four occur in Africa: I. dundoensis was formerly in a separate genus Cinitogomphus. Males are very large (hindwing 38-51 mm) black-and-yellow dragonflies that perch conspicuously on prominent stakes over water, raising abdomen to display the distinctly foliated end. Unlike most gomphids they favour calm water: I. ferox occurs at marshes, ponds, lakes and calm rivers, I. dundoensis in marshy rivers like in the Okavango Delta, and I. regisalberti and its western counterpart I. fraseri at rivers, often in forest. [Adapted from Dijkstra & Clausnitzer 2014]

Diagnosis

Male of genus is similar to Diastatomma and Gomphidia by (a) dorsal border of metepisternum, close to Hw base, with robust spine; and (b) triangles of 3-4 cells; anal triangle of 5 cells, although rarely 4 to 7. However, Ictinogomphus differs by the distinct foliations on S8. [Adapted from Dijkstra & Clausnitzer 2014]


Ictinogomphus dundoensis Pinhey, 1961. Male © Nicolas Meziere

Map citation: Clausnitzer, V., K.-D.B. Dijkstra, R. Koch, J.-P. Boudot, W.R.T. Darwall, J. Kipping, B. Samraoui, M.J. Samways, J.P. Simaika & F. Suhling, 2012. Focus on African Freshwaters: hotspots of dragonfly diversity and conservation concern. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 10: 129-134.


References

  • Kimmins, D.E. (1958). New species and subspecies of Odonata. Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History). Entomology, 7, 347-358.
  • Dijkstra, K.-D.B. (in prep.) A review of Afrotropical lindeniine Gomphidae (Odonata). Zoologische Mededelingen.
  • Pinhey, E.C.G. (1961). Dragonflies (Odonata) of Central Africa. Occasional Papers Rhodes-Livingstone Museum, 14, 1-97. [PDF file]
  • Lieftinck, M.A. (1969). Odonates Anisoptères - Odonata Anisoptera. Explor. hydrob. Lac Bangweolo and Luapula, 14,: 1-64. [PDF file]

Citation: Dijkstra, K.-D.B (editor). African Dragonflies and Damselflies Online. http://addo.adu.org.za/ [2017-10-21].