Genus Idomacromia Karsch, 1896
shadowcruisers

Type species: Idomacromia proavita Karsch, 1896

Introduction

Four species (one unnamed from Gabon) are endemic to the tropical forests of western and central Africa. They are very elusive and probably greatly under-recorded, breeding in small rainforest streams and seepages. The flattened larvae of I. proavita can be found quite easily by sifting through coarse leaf litter overlaying seeps. Adults may only visit reproductive habitats in shade or when it is overcast, possibly hunting at dusk, and seem to fly rather low. They are (fairly) large (hindwing 33-46) and very dark, with metallic green frons and thorax. As males are even more rarely found than females, that of I. jillianae is unknown. [Adapted from Dijkstra & Clausnitzer 2014]

Diagnosis

Male of genus is similar to Phyllomacromia by (a) wings with 2-8 Cux; (b) supratriangles with 1-6 cross-veins; (c) Hw arculus far proximal to triangle. However, differs by (1) anal loop elongate rather than stout, of 14-29 cells, extends about to level of radial fork, with distinct midrib; (2) sectors of arculus only fused at their origin. [Adapted from Dijkstra & Clausnitzer 2014; this diagnosis not yet verified by author]


Idomacromia proavita Karsch, 1896. Female © KD Dijkstra


Idomacromia proavita Karsch, 1896. Female © KD Dijkstra

Map citation: Clausnitzer, V., K.-D.B. Dijkstra, R. Koch, J.-P. Boudot, W.R.T. Darwall, J. Kipping, B. Samraoui, M.J. Samways, J.P. Simaika & F. Suhling, 2012. Focus on African Freshwaters: hotspots of dragonfly diversity and conservation concern. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 10: 129-134.


References

  • Legrand, J. (1984). Un deuxieme Idomacromia de la foret Gabonaise: I. lieftincki spec. nov. (Anisoptera: Corduliidae). Odonatologica, 13, 113-117. [PDF file]
  • Dijkstra, K.-D.B., and Kisakye, J.J. (2004). Idomacromia jillianae sp. nov. from Uganda (Odonata: Corduliidae). International Journal of Odonatology, 7, 459-466. [PDF file]

Citation: Dijkstra, K.-D.B (editor). African Dragonflies and Damselflies Online. http://addo.adu.org.za/ [2017-12-11].