Palpopleura jucunda Rambur, 1842
Yellow-veined Widow

Type locality: Cape Province, South Africa

Diagnosis

Male is most similar to P. deceptor by (a) pale face contrasting with dark metallic dorsum of frons; (b) pale sides of thorax with dark stripes; (c) basal black on wings fragmented by clear areas and/or pale veins, does not extend beyond node, at most isolated dark marking around node. However, differs by (1) much smaller size,with Hw 15-21 mm; (2) many veins in wings pale, contrasting with dark markings; (3) 2-5 Cux in Fw, 2-3 Cux in Hw; (4) cubital space of wings, and usually anal field, filled with black. [Adapted from Dijkstra & Clausnitzer 2014]

Habitat description

Standing and often temporary waters, streams, headwaters, seeps and springs in open landscapes, but sometimes in open areas in forest or shaded by gallery forest. Usually with emergent vegetation, often coarse detritus and a soft (like muddy) bottom, and probably boggy. From 0 to 2400 m above sea level, but mostly between 800 and 1800.

Distribution

confirmed: Angola; Botswana; Cameroon; Democratic Republic of the Congo; Ethiopia; Kenya; Malawi; Mali; Mozambique; Namibia; Nigeria; Republic of South Africa; Sierra Leone; Sudan; Swaziland; Tanzania; Uganda; Zambia; Zimbabwe; NOT confirmed: Côte d'Ivoire; South Sudan


Male © Hans-Joachim Clausnitzer

Map citation: Clausnitzer, V., K.-D.B. Dijkstra, R. Koch, J.-P. Boudot, W.R.T. Darwall, J. Kipping, B. Samraoui, M.J. Samways, J.P. Simaika & F. Suhling, 2012. Focus on African Freshwaters: hotspots of dragonfly diversity and conservation concern. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 10: 129-134.


Barcode specimen(s):


Adult, female; Zimbabwe, Manicaland, Chimanimani National Park © Dijkstra, K.-D.B.


Adult, male; Zimbabwe, Manicaland, Chimanimani National Park © Dijkstra, K.-D.B.


Adult, female; Zimbabwe, Manicaland, Chimanimani National Park © Dijkstra, K.-D.B.


Adult, male; Zimbabwe, Manicaland, Nyanga National Park © Dijkstra, K.-D.B. & U. Bjelke


Male; Democratic Republic of Congo, Katanga, © Dijkstra, K.-D.B.


Female; Democratic Republic of Congo, Katanga, © Dijkstra, K.-D.B.

References

  • Rambur, P. (1842). Histoire Naturelle des Insectes. Neuroptères. Insectes Neuroptères. Paris: Librairie Encyclopédique de Roret xvii, pp.534.
  • Ris, F. (1921). The Odonata or Dragonflies of South Africa. Annals South African Museum, XVIII, 245-452. [PDF file]
  • Pinhey, E.C.G. (1961). Dragonflies (Odonata) of Central Africa. Occasional Papers Rhodes-Livingstone Museum, 14, 1-97. [PDF file]
  • Pinhey, E.C.G. (1966). Check-list of dragonflies (Odonata) from Malawi, with description of a new Teinobasis Kirby. Arnoldia, 2, 1-24. [PDF file]
  • Barnard, K.H. (1937). Notes on dragon-flies (Odonata) of the S. W. Cape with descriptions of the nymphs and of new species. Annals South African Museum, 32, 169-260. [PDF file]
  • Ris, F. (1931). Odonata aus Süd-Angola. Revue Suisse Zoologie, 38, 97-112. [PDF file]
  • Schouteden, H. (1934). Annales Musee Congo belge Zoologie 3 Section 2, 3, 1-84. [PDF file]
  • Lieftinck, M.A. (1969). Odonates Anisoptères - Odonata Anisoptera. Explor. hydrob. Lac Bangweolo and Luapula, 14, 1-64. [PDF file]

Citation: Dijkstra, K.-D.B (editor). African Dragonflies and Damselflies Online. http://addo.adu.org.za/ [2019-12-12].