Genus Lindenia de Haan, 1826
bladetails

Type species: Aeschna tetraphylla Vander Linden, 1825

Introduction

For an introduction to this genus, please refer to: Dijkstra, K.-D.B. & R. Lewington, 2006. Field guide to the Dragonflies of Britain and Europe. British Wildlife Publishing. 1-320.

Diagnosis

The largest gomphid in North Africa (1-2 cm longer than Onychogomphus forcipatus), where its combination of great length (about 7-8 cm), large leaf-like flaps on S7-8 and triangles in wings crossed by veins is unique. The flaps on S7 rule out all other species. Paragomphus and Onychogomphus have flaps on S8-9 instead of S7-8, but only in Paragomphus are they similarly large. The yellow to pale-brown pterostigma is relatively large and long. Triangles in the wings are divided by cross-veins into 3-4 cells, but are single-celled in other North African gomphids. The upper appendages are finger-like and almost straight, about twice as long as S10, dwarfing the lowers. Paragomphus and Onychogomphus have strongly (down- and/or in-) curved uppers. At a glance may be mistaken for the long-bodied skimmers Orthetrum sabina and O. trinacria, which lack wide flaps and separated eyes. [Adapted from Dijkstra & Lewington 2006]

Map citation: Clausnitzer, V., K.-D.B. Dijkstra, R. Koch, J.-P. Boudot, W.R.T. Darwall, J. Kipping, B. Samraoui, M.J. Samways, J.P. Simaika & F. Suhling, 2012. Focus on African Freshwaters: hotspots of dragonfly diversity and conservation concern. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 10: 129-134.


Reference

  • Dijkstra, K.-D.B., and Lewington, R. (2006). Field guide to the Dragonflies of Britain and Europe. British Wildlife Publishing. 1-320.

Citation: Dijkstra, K.-D.B (editor). African Dragonflies and Damselflies Online. http://addo.adu.org.za/ [2017-08-22].