Genus Mastigogomphus Cammaerts, 2004
snorkeltails

Synonyms:

  • scientific: Neurogomphus (Mastigogomphus)

Type species: Oxygomphus chapini Klots, 1944

Introduction

Three fairly small (hindwing 25-27 mm) tropical African species that were formerly treated as a subgenus of Neurogomphus are so distinct (particularly in the larvae) that they deserve generic recognition. Adults are even more rarely seen than those of Neurogomphus (they have never been photographed!) and their habits are unknown, but the distinctive exuviae with their snorkel-like abdominal segment 10 are occasionally found along streams and rivers. [Adapted from Dijkstra & Clausnitzer 2014]

Diagnosis

Male of genus is similar to Neurogomphus by (a) posterior hamules 2-6 times longer than wide, leaning forward; (b) anal triangle of 3 cells, although sometimes also 4; (c) hind femur longer than breadth of head, although it reaches halfway S2 at most and bears only small spines; (d) S10 about as long as S9, basal half sharply constricted; (e) cerci without both an inner branch or ventral tooth near base; (f) branches of epiproct diverge widely, often extending laterally of cerci (dorsal view), always terminating in simply pointed apices (lateral view). However, differs by (1) occiput over 3x wider than high, its smooth border straight to concave; (2) face including labrum all yellow, contrasting with darker vertex and occiput; (3) postdorsal stripes short, well separated from collar and antehumeral stripes, which are broad and complete; (4) Hw Cux well proximal to distal border of anal triangle; (5) cerci parallel, leaving branches of epiproct well-visible in dorsal view. [Adapted from Dijkstra & Clausnitzer 2014]

Map citation: Clausnitzer, V., K.-D.B. Dijkstra, R. Koch, J.-P. Boudot, W.R.T. Darwall, J. Kipping, B. Samraoui, M.J. Samways, J.P. Simaika & F. Suhling, 2012. Focus on African Freshwaters: hotspots of dragonfly diversity and conservation concern. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 10: 129-134.


Citation: Dijkstra, K.-D.B (editor). African Dragonflies and Damselflies Online. http://addo.adu.org.za/ [2017-03-24].